Monday, April 20, 2015

Maps Class at the Cornerstone Center for the Arts




Hoosier Cartography:  Indiana History through Maps Presentation in Downtown Muncie

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) is presenting Hoosier Cartography: Indiana History through Maps in downtown Muncie tomorrow, April 21.  The class will be from 6:00 to 7:00 pm on Tuesday at the Cornerstone Center for the Arts at 520 East Main Street in the Founders Room on the second floor.  (Free parking is available).  The special program features maps from the GRMC and historic photographs from the Libraries’ Digital Media Repository.

The GRMC has been creating custom maps about Indiana history for use in fourth-grade classrooms, and these maps will be featured—Indiana political history, music history, automobile history, women’s history, Indiana authors, and sports and movies.  The program will also include historic maps of Indiana, agriculture and industry, health and welfare, civil rights, elections, education, weather and disasters, and culture and the arts.  Maps related to current events like the measles outbreak and the Religious Freedom Act will be included.  City maps and maps of Ball State University will also be shown.

The class is ideal for teachers and other researchers as it will provide links to digital resources.  This one-time workshop is free and open to the public.

For more information, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Thursday, April 16, 2015

Let's Move Campaign Creates GIS Map


Let’s Move Campaign Creates GIS Map

“Let’s Move” is a campaign to combat childhood obesity.  To commemorate the fifth anniversary of the program, First Lady Michelle Obama has launched an interactive online map to encourage people to join their local “Let’s Move” program.  The map is sponsored by the Partnership for a Healthier America and allows users to see what schools, cities, businesses, or nonprofit organizations feature programs to get young people more physically active.

The map is built on the leading GIS software producer Esri’s ArcGIS Online platform.  Users can search for a specific participant or view the map of programs near their city after entering a zip code or city or state.  The amount of participation is also shown. 

The “Let’s Move” map page includes nutritional information, action plans, and activities.  And the local projects include childcare and gardening programs affiliated with the “Let’s Move” campaign.

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) offers access to the leading ESRI GIS software and online tutorials, datasets, online mapping applications, in-house GIS data, and one-on-one assistance from the GIS Specialist.


For more information about using GIS in research and learning, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Tuesday, April 14, 2015

GIS Story Map of the Lincoln Assassination


Mapping the Death of President Lincoln

On the 150th anniversary of the assassination of Abraham Lincoln, leading GIS software developer ESRI has created an interactive story map of the events leading up to his death on April 14, 1865.  Users can take a geographic tour tracking John Wilkes Booth and the other conspirators on a 1865 map of Washington, DC from the collection of David Rumsey.

The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) on the second floor of Bracken Library provides ESRI GIS software and instructional assistance from the GIS Specialist, Angela Gibson.  For more information about using GIS for research and learning, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

John Wilkes Booth Escape Route Map Available from Ball State University Libraries


John Wilkes Booth Escape Map Marks 150th Anniversary of Lincoln Assassination

Today marks the 150th anniversary of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln at Ford’s Theatre on April 14, 1865.  The Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) includes many maps depicting the events surrounding the Civil War, including a map of the assassin’s escape route from the Capital.

The map, John Wilkes Booth: Escape of an Assassin, was published by Communication Design in 2007 as part of the Maryland Civil War Trails series.  The map shows the route taken from Ford’s Theatre in Washington, D.C. to the Garrett farm in Virginia with related present-day points of interest.

According to the map, “Booth fled over the Navy Yard Bridge into Southern Maryland. With fellow conspirator David Herold, he stopped about midnight at widow Mary E. Surratt’s tavern in the village of Surrattsville.”  Surratt was later convicted as a conspirator in the plot against the President and provided storage of rifles and other supplies for Booth.

The fugitives received treatment at the house of Dr. Samuel A. Mudd (now a museum), who was also later convicted in the conspiracy.  The pair traveled to the home of Samuel Cox in Rich Hill and hid in a nearby pine thicket.  Booth and Herold crossed the Potomac River on April 21 and then the Rappahanock River in Virginia, where they found shelter at the Richard Garrett farm. 

Federal troops found the fugitives hiding in the barn on April 26:  Herold surrendered, but Booth refused.  “…the barn was set on fire. The soldiers could see Booth through the slats in the barn, and Sergeant Boston Corbett shot him in the back of the neck.”

The map also includes sites related to the Civil War near Chesapeake Bay.  Descriptions of specific sites, events, and biographies include Point Lookout State Park, the contributions of African Americans, female spies and smugglers, and the role federal troops kept Maryland in the Union.

Other maps in the GRMC from the Maryland Civil War Trails series include Baltimore: A House Divided; Gettysburg: Invasion and Retreat; Lee Invades Maryland: 1862 Antietam Campaign; and Virginia-Maryland Civil War Trails.

Maps from the GRMC circulate for two weeks or longer.  For more information, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Thursday, April 09, 2015

Golf Maps Available from Ball State University Libraries

Augusta National, Augusta, Georgia

Mapping the Masters:  World Atlas of Golf from Ball State University Libraries

World Atlas of Golf is available from the Atlas Collection on the second floor of Bracken Library.  The atlas by Mark Rowlinson was published in 2008 and features computer-generated maps of golf courses around the world—from St. Andrews in Scotland to Casa De Campo in the Dominican Republic.  The atlas features information about the architecture and design of the courses and illustrations of signature holes.

Atlases may be circulated for 28 days or longer.  For more information, please contact the GIS Research and Map Collection at 765-285-1097.

Wednesday, April 08, 2015

Boston Massachusetts Maps Available from Ball State University Libraries


Boston, Massachusetts Map of the Month

The “Map of the Month” on display in the Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) is a map of Boston, Massachusetts, to commemorate the Boston Marathon on April 20. 

The map was illustrated by Barbara Spurll and published by Archar, Incorporated in 1977.  This pictorial map features famous people, landmarks, and fun facts about the city of Boston.  Click the map above to enlarge to view the John Kennedy birthplace, Fenway Park, and the Harvard and Yale rowing teams on the Charles River.

The map will be exhibited in the front windows of the GRMC on the second floor of Bracken Library through the end of April.  Maps from the GRMC circulate for two weeks or longer.


For more information about using maps for exhibits, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Monday, April 06, 2015

Baseball Maps Available from Ball State University Libraries










Opening Day:  The Geography of America’s Pastime

It’s Opening Day at ballparks around the country, and the Ball State University Libraries’ GIS Research and Map Collection (GRMC) offers baseball fans a glimpse at some baseball-related maps.

The GRMC includes a travel map locating all of the Major League Baseball stadiums.  North America Baseball Travel Map also includes contact information for every major league, minor league, and independent professional baseball team in the United States and Canada.

The GRMC also includes historic and current U.S. Geological Survey topographic maps that show details about the location and surroundings of stadiums and how the sites have developed over time.  Dodger Stadium located on the 1966 Los Angeles topographic quadrangle map is shown above (click to enlarge) just after it was completed in 1962.

Sanborn Fire Insurance maps are available for some cities, providing details about the stadium structures.  The map of Fenway Park (above) is from a collection of 1975 Boston Sanborn maps available in the GRMC.

The GRMC has also created custom maps related to the history of baseball.  Black Diamonds: Negro League Baseball Teams, 1920-1949, (shown above) marks the locations of the Negro League teams in the U.S.  Photographs featured on the map are from the book Playing America’s Game by Michael L. Cooper.  A copy of the map is available from the Cardinal Scholar digital media repository.

Another map, The Girls of Summer: All-American Girls Professional Baseball League Teams, 1943-1954, (above) commemorates the women who played professionally beginning during World War II.  The map was created for Women’s History Month and is based on the book A Whole New Ballgame: The Story of All-American Girls Professional Baseball League by Sue Macy available from the Educational Technology and Resources Collection in the lower level of Bracken Library.  This map is also available in Cardinal Scholar, and all of the maps from the GRMC can be borrowed via interlibrary loan.

The Atlas of Sport available in the Atlas Collection on the second floor of Bracken Library features maps on the “American game,” including the map shown above (click to enlarge) depicting the number of high-school boys playing baseball in school leagues, with Iowa (the site of Field of Dreams) leading the nation.

For more information about these cartographic resources, please contact the GRMC at 765-285-1097.

Tuesday, March 31, 2015

Play Pac-Man Using Google Maps


Google Maps Makes Your City a Pac-Man Game


Open Google Maps today, and prepare to play the classic arcade game Pac-Man.  Next to the Street View option in the bottom left corner, a Pac-Man icon will appear.  Click the icon to make the streets a maze complete with the blinking features of the game.

Note:  If enough streets are not on the screen, the game cannot start.  But the “I’m Feeling Lucky” button allows users to play Pac-Man on Google Maps in another location.  Also Pac-Man only moves on the current screen—users will not be able to see what is happening off the map on the screen.